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Fundraisers

Chicken Barbecue

Fruit Sale

Food Stand at Lamb and Webster Auction

Chicken Barbecue
I have not heard anyone say it, but in Kiwanis, the attitude on fund raising seems to be to give something for what we get.  We have had other fund raisers (dinner theater to name one), but now the Chicken Barbecue and Fruit Sale are the sources of income for the project account.  We used to have a BBQ in the fall and one in the spring, but now we have just one BBQ in the spring/late winter. BBQ memories include cooking in the wind, snow, rain, having no customers (horse show), water running through the pits (car show at Community Park), smoke so thick you could not see a thing (Dick's Service). Through it all we succeeded. I cannot remember ever not having chicken ready to serve at the appointed time. We are in a transition period with the Chicken BBQ. Questions like "where will we cook?," and "do we make new BBQ pits since ours are showing their years of service?" are asked quite a bit (Dale Lampila and the shop class at G.I. fabricated pits for us years ago.)  We fondly refer to our sauce as Dena Schue's recipe, although it is the Cornell Chicken Barbecue Sauce developed at the former Cornell Poultry Research Farm in Springville.  We usually sell about eight-hundred chicken halves per barbecue.

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Fruit Sale
The Fruit Sale, navel oranges and grapefruit from Harvey's Grove, Indian River, FL, has changed greatly but remains a dependable project. The arrival of fruit is anticipated each year by our loyal customers.  We used to get two shipments but have cut to one shipment because so many other organizations are now selling fruit. A refrigerated truck brings the fruit direct from Florida to Fred Hofmann's potato warehouse. You can feel the Florida heat as you unload the fruit.  We always divert some boxes of fruit as a donation to the Food Pantry.

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Food Stand at Lamb & Webster Auction
"A while ago I was approached by a young woman with a cute little seven-pound bundle wrapped in a soft blanket. She said, 'Hello, remember me? We stayed overnight in Toronto'. I did indeed remember her and I remembered staying overnight in Toronto She introduced her husband and we talked about Jerry DeLisle's Jazz Ensemble and the time twenty-five Springville kids played in the Maple Leaf Gardens and two other locations during the Kiwanis International Convention. The fond memories of that trip in 1979 remain vivid. We worked on the trip most of the year and it is the most memorable moment for me in Kiwanis. The toughest nut to crack in a plan of that magnitude was how to pay for it. Lloyd Lamb volunteered the food concession at his up-coming first machinery auction. Paul Fornes laid down the plan that has served us for the auction every year since. Fred Hofmann got the supplies and we all, kids too, worked our butts off At the end of the day we had enough money for the trip. A week later, I realized it."   The above is a quote from the Kiwanis Bulletin often years ago. We have continued the food stand at The Lamb & Webster Auction ever since, under the direction of Terry Fornes. It has been a fantastic opportunity for the club because we can use the proceeds for the administration fund. This has allowed us to keep our dues down and gives us some freedom in spending money on ourselves, particularly the food at the summer work nights.  Before the auction, on work nights members paid for the food we ate. Back then if you bought the steak, then you could be cook and avoid working your butt off.

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